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Fall 2020

16:155:531:01 Biochemical Engineering

Wednesdays, 5:00 – 8:00 pm, online

Syllabus (subject to some alterations)

Chapters from Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts by M. L. Shuler, F. Kargi, and M. DeLisa, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall, 2017

Module Topic Chapter Potential Guest
1 Introduction 1
2 Protein structure and stability 2.2.1 Prof. Schuster (confirmed)
3 Enzymes 3 Prof. Chundawat (confirmed)
4 Cell growth kinetics 6, 7
Quiz 1 (Modules 1-4)
5 Bioreactors 9
6 Aeration and Scale-up 10, 12 Dr. Brieva (BMS) (confirmed)
Design Study (Modules 5-6)
7 Genetic engineering and cell line development 8,14
8 Metabolic engineering 5, 14 Prof. Zhang
9 Bioseparations 11
Quiz 2 (Modules 7-9)
10 Monoclonal antibodies
11 Cell and gene therapies 15
Integrative Study (emphasizing Modules 10-12)

01:090:101 Opportunities and Challenges in Nanomedicine

Fridays, 12:00 – 1:20 pm, online

Syllabus (subject to some alterations)

Date Topic Discussion or Demo Reading
Week 1 Introduction/ overview. Why nano? http://www.understandingnano.com/medicine.html; https://www.futureforall.org/futureofmedicine/nanomedicine.htm
Week 2 Pharmacokinetics of drugs and nanoparticles In vitro/in vivo and animal to human correlation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMRZqdrkCZw
Week 3 How to make nanoparticles Flash nanoprecipitation (demo) https://engineering.princeton.edu/news/2018/01/09/life-saving-medicines-grow-fundamental-chemistry-win-gates-foundation-backing;

Composite FNP particle patent

Week 4 Nanoparticle drug delivery systems for cancer Barriers to clinical translation Shi, Nature Rev. Cancer, 17:20 (2017);

http://www.thenanoman.org/ (see videos)

Week 5 Nanoparticle drug delivery systems for other applications Nanohydrogels (demo) Blanco et al., Nature Biotechnol., 33:941 (2015)
Week 6 Gene-based therapies Student presentations 1 Smalley, Nature Biotechnol., 35:998 (2017);

 

Week 7 R&D infrastructure and regulatory pathways Student presentations 2 Morello, Nature 555:572 (2018)
Week 8 Diagnostics and Nanoimaging Rare earth imaging (demo); Student presentations 3 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-biomarkers-say-about-health/
Week 9 Nanotoxicology Student presentations 4,5 Fadeel et al., Nature Nanotechnol., 13:537 (2018)

 

Week 10 Rutgers nanomedicine research Guest researchers:

TBD

None

Spring 2020

16:125:590:01 Drug Delivery Principles and Applications
16:155:544:01 Pharmaceutical Organic Nanotechnology

Monday – 5:00 – 8:00 pm
BME-126

This course will discuss the engineering of novel pharmaceutical delivery systems with enhanced efficacy and safety profiles, with an emphasis on the design and application of materials that overcome drug delivery barriers or challenges. Topics will include drug delivery fundamentals and transport mechanisms, materials and formulations for drug delivery, and applications.

Syllabus (subject to some alterations)

Week Topic
  Drug Delivery Barriers and Formulations
1 Introduction and Overview
2 Pharmacokinetics
3 Transport in Tissues
4 Cellular and Intracellular Transport of Drugs
5 Drug Conjugates and Nanoparticles
6 Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms
8 Review and Exam 1
Engineered Drug Delivery Systems
7 Controlled Release Drug Delivery Systems
9 Physiologically Targeted Drug Delivery
10 Precision Targeted Drug Delivery
Applications
11 Transdermal Drug Delivery
12 GI and Pulmonary Delivery
13 Gene and Oligonucleotide Delivery
14 Review and Exam 2
15 Term Project Submission and Peer Review

 

Fall 2019

On sabbatical

Previous Courses Taught

2001 Instructor, “Enzyme Engineering” (155:534)
Enrollment: 5 students

2001-2004 (4x) Instructor, “Biomedical Thermodynamics and Kinetics” (125:314)
Cumulative enrollment: 195 students

2001-2002 (2x) Instructor, “Chemical Engineering Analysis I” (155:201)
Cumulative enrollment: 80 students

2002 Co-instructor, “Introduction to Biomedical Engineering” (125:201), 8 lectures
Enrollment: 85 students

2003-2008 (6x) Co-instructor, “BME Measurements and Analysis Laboratory” (125:314), 2 lectures + laboratories
Cumulative enrollment: ~400 students

2004-2007 (4x) Instructor, “Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics” (155:511)
Cumulative enrollment: 55 students

2005-2010 (4x) Instructor, “Integrative Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering” (125:584)
Cumulative enrollment: 39 students

2008 Lead Instructor, “BME Measurements and Analysis Laboratory” (125:315)
Enrollment: 72 students

2008 Instructor, “Preparing Future Faculty II” (125:632)
Enrollment: 11 students

2010 Instructor, “Preparing Future Faculty I” (125:631)
Enrollment: 9 students

2009, 2011 (2x) Instructor, “Pharmaceutical Organic Nanotechnology (Drug Delivery)” (155:544)
Cumulative enrollment: 29 students

2009, 2011 (2x) Instructor, “Nanotechnology in Cancer” (01:090:101)
Cumulative enrollment: 40 students

2009-2011 (3x) Instructor, “Chemical Engineering Kinetics” (155:411)
Cumulative enrollment: 183 students

2012-18 (7x) Instructor, “Drug Delivery Principles and Applications” (125:590/155:544)
Cumulative enrollment: 176 students

2012-14 (3x) Instructor, “Introduction to Biochemical Engineering” (155:411)
Cumulative enrollment: 269 students

2013-18 (6x) Instructor, “Teaching in the Engineering Curriculum” (155:605)
Cumulative enrollment: 60 students

2016-17 (2x) Instructor, “Biological Foundations of Chemical Engineering” (155:210)
Cumulative enrollment: 234 students

2018 (1x) Instructor, “Opportunities and Challenges in Nanomedicine” (090:101)
Enrollment: 20 students

2019 (1x) Instructor, “Biochemical Engineering” (155:531)
Enrollment: 27 students